Video Series 5 of 6: Examine Your Results

In the previous video, Design and Conduct Your Experiment, we received valuable advice on how to perform experiments and collect data.

In this video the JPL team digs deeper to understand the data collected from their experiments. Also, they continue the conversation of on VARIABLES when conducting experiments. Remember, a variable is the one condition that you change in an experiment while all other details of your experiments remain CONSTANT.

Overview: How to Do a Science Fair Project

Step 1: Get Your Idea and Do Some Research

Step 2: Ask a Testable Question

Step 3: Design and Conduct Your Experiment

Step 4: Examine Your Results

Step 5: Communicate Your Experiment and Results

(NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Special thanks to the team at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. On their website, you can view and download and assortment of educational materials such as NASA missions details, images, videos, audio and more.

LEARN MORE: SCIENCE BUDDIES – HANDS-ON SCIENCE RESOURCES

LEARN MORE: HOME SCIENCE TOOLS – SCIENCE PROJECTS

LEARN MORE: EDUCATION – ENGINEERING PROJECTS

Define VARIABLES in a science project? Using Arby and Serina’s example, list the variables you noticed in their experiments?



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23 replies

  1. One variable I saw was the different runners and how tired they were before the run. Also, different amounts of water they drank.

  2. Video series 5 of 6 examine your results

    One variable i saw was Arby show us was he changed the springs then it shot differently.

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  1. Video Series 2 of 6: Get Your Idea and Do Some Research « 34 Kiwis
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